Have a question or just want to set up an appointment?

Contact us and we'll reach out to you soon.

Reprinted from New Jersey Top Dentists Magazine

Local Periodontist To Display Drawings and Paintings at Morristown Medical Center

MORRISTOWN, N.J. — Dr. David Goteiner, a Chester-based periodontist and artist, will display selected drawings and paintings at a solo art exhibit from Aug. 4 through Sept. 14 at Morristown Medical Center. The exhibit is the latest in a series sponsored by the Women’s Association of Morristown Medical Center.

Goteiner has selected 34 pieces that will be displayed in the main corridor of the Medical Center (Madison 1). Part of the proceeds of the art show will go to the Woman’s Association of Morristown Medical Center.

Two of the pieces are Rendevous and Venezia. Rendevous is a painting of a Norwegian three-masted training schooner plying the North Sea on its way to a meeting with mythical creatures. Venezia is a study in light and shadows on Ria de la Vesta, Canal of the Tailors. It portrays a typical scene from Venice that disappears just as it captures your heart.

Born in Mannheim, Germany, Goteiner came to this country as a baby and developed a love for the arts at an early age. In 1982, he met highly regarded painter Anatoly Ivanov, then a recent immigrant from Russia. From then on, he has pursued his passion to paint and has continued to study with Ivanov.

Not all of Goteiner’s art is on a canvas. He is a practicing periodontist who sees patients in Chester. He received his dental and specialty training at Columbia and Harvard universities. His work restoring teeth and gums is, itself, a form of artistry. He also teaches at the University of Medicine and Dentistry in Newark. He lives in Sunset Lake with his wife, Carrie.

More information about Goteiner’s periodontal practice and samples of his artwork can be found at www.artofperio.com or by calling (908) 879-7709.

 

New Study Finds Positive Association Between Periodontal Disease and Coronary Heart Disease

Moonlight

Reprinted from the American Academy of Periodontology website.

Periodontal disease and coronary heart disease are widespread conditions; therefore, an association between the two is an important scientific subject from a preventive outlook

CHICAGO - September 26 2006 - Researchers found an increased risk of coronary heart disease for people below the age of 60 who have more than four millimeters of alveolar bone loss (the bone that holds the teeth in the mouth) from periodontal disease, according to a new study that is printed in the Journal of Periodontology.

It was found that participants with coronary heart disease had an increase of periodontal disease indicators, including alveolar bone loss, clinical attachment loss and bleeding compared to the group without coronary heart disease.

"This study is distinctive because to our knowledge, it is the first to include both the alveolar bone loss and full mouth recording of clinical attachment loss as measurements of periodontal disease," explains Dr. Karen Geismar, Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. "Alveolar bone loss was recently found to be the periodontal variable that had the strongest association to coronary heart disease."

The association between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease has been that chronic infections and the inflammatory response from diseases such as periodontal disease may be involved in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis.

"A number of pathways are suspected to be involved," said Geismar. "One way is that periodontal bacteria directly invade the arterial wall and another way is that bacterial products from the periodontal pocket exert a systemic effect on atherosclerosis development based on the immune system."

"This is one of many studies suggesting that the spread of bacteria and bacterial products from the periodontal lesion to the bloodstream may contribute to coronary heart disease," said Preston D. Miller, DDS and AAP President. "However, it is still uncertain whether or not the association between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease is causal. Until we know more, it is very important that people talk to their dentist or periodontist about their periodontal health."

Background Information

This study included 110 patients with coronary heart disease and 140 people without coronary heart disease. The mean age was 65 years and 70 percent of the participants were male. All 250 participants received a medical and dental examination. Researchers found a significantly higher odds ratio of 6.6 for individuals below age 60 having being a patient with coronary heart disease when having a mean alveolar bone loss of more than four millimeters.



 
Please send website comments or questions to feedback@artofperio.com.